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batnamlathe_riskassessment

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batnamlathe_riskassessment [2020-05-31 17:36]
jerome_woodwark Added content for all hazards
batnamlathe_riskassessment [2020-05-31 17:46] (current)
jerome_woodwark
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 ^ What are the hazards? ^ Who might be harmed and how? ^ What are you already doing? ^ Do you need to do anything else to control this risk? ^ Action by who? ^ Action by when? ^ Done ^ ^ What are the hazards? ^ Who might be harmed and how? ^ What are you already doing? ^ Do you need to do anything else to control this risk? ^ Action by who? ^ Action by when? ^ Done ^
-| Entanglement. Long hair, dangling jewellery, loose clothing, gloves or rags can become entangled with rotating parts, rapidly dragging the user onto them before the machine can be stopped. Application of cutting oil using a brush also presents an entanglement risk. Chance of serious injury or death. | Lathe users and others nearby. | Loose clothing should not be worn, or should be covered with an appropriately secured apron. Sleeves should be rolled up. Long hair is to be tied back. Loose jewellery and rings should be removed. Gloves should not be worn when the machine is in operation. Rags should not be used to e.g. clear chips while the machine is operating. Cutting fluid should ideally be applied before performing a cut. The chuck guard should be lowered when running the lathe. | Adding an interlock to the chuck guard would help mitigate the risk of entanglement in the chuck, however this is an additional precaution not a substitute for the existing rules. | TBD | TBD | TBD | +| Entanglement. Long hair, dangling jewellery, loose clothing, gloves or rags can become entangled with rotating parts, rapidly dragging the user onto them before the machine can be stopped. Power feeds for the apron (to move the cutting tool along the length of the workpiece) and saddle cross-slide (to move the cutting tool into or across an exposed face of the workpiece) are ACME-threaded screw shafts running horizontally below the main ways of the lathe. Loose clothing can catch in these shafts if they are being driven. Application of cutting oil using a brush also presents an entanglement risk. Chance of serious injury or death. | Lathe users and others nearby. | Loose clothing should not be worn, or should be covered with an appropriately secured apron. Sleeves should be rolled up. Long hair is to be tied back. Loose jewellery and rings should be removed. Gloves should not be worn when the machine is in operation. Rags should not be used to e.g. clear chips while the machine is operating. Cutting fluid should ideally be applied before performing a cut. The chuck guard should be lowered when running the lathe. The power feeds should not be engaged if they are not needed for the job in hand, they can be disabled on the headstock gearboxes. | Adding an interlock to the chuck guard would help mitigate the risk of entanglement in the chuck, however this is an additional precaution not a substitute for the existing rules. | TBD | TBD | TBD | 
-| Flying parts. Workpieces and tools can be ejected from the lathe if correct procedures are not followed regarding setup and operations. Chuck keys are a particular hazard due to their mass and the speed with which they can be ejected if left in the chuck when the machine is started up. Unbalanced workpieces require careful and secure clamping as they will experience significant outward loading when rotated at speed. Items that fall onto the chuck while it is rotating may be ejected at speed. | Lathe users and others in the workshop | The lathe should not be started until the user has confirmed the workpiece and tool is properly secured, the chuck key is removed, and the work area / machine ways are completely clear. The chuck guard should be lowered when running the lathe. The headstock should not be used to store parts / tools as these can fall into the spinning machinery.| Use of self-ejecting chuck keys would help mitigate the risk of flying chuck keys. The chuck key should have a designated storage location it is returned to after use. Training on proper workpiece clamping and the dangers of turning unbalanced workpieces is recommended. An interlock on the chuck guard would prevent keys being left in the chuck. | TBD | TBD | TBD| +| Flying parts. Workpieces and tools can be ejected from the lathe if correct procedures are not followed regarding setup and operations. Chuck keys are a particular hazard due to their mass and the speed with which they can be ejected if left in the chuck when the machine is started up. Unbalanced workpieces require careful and secure clamping as they will experience significant outward loading when rotated at speed. Items that fall onto the chuck while it is rotating may be ejected at speed. Setting the chuck speed and power feed rates too high for the work material and tool type can damage the tool bit and cause it to fracture and fly off at speed or the workpiece to get pulled out of the chuck jaws and similarly fly off at speed. Failing to secure the chuck on the headstock spindle -- the Colchester lathe uses a "​quick-change"​ headstock spindle system called Camlock which means the chuck can be located in place on the spindle but it might not be properly secured.| Lathe users and others in the workshop | The lathe should not be started until the user has confirmed the workpiece and tool is properly secured, the chuck key is removed, and the work area / machine ways are completely clear. The chuck guard should be lowered when running the lathe. The headstock should not be used to store parts / tools as these can fall into the spinning machinery. Visual inspection of the position of the three cam pins securing the chuck to the headstock spindle is essential before starting the lathe, especially if someone else has used the lathe before you.| Use of self-ejecting chuck keys would help mitigate the risk of flying chuck keys. The chuck key should have a designated storage location it is returned to after use. Training on proper workpiece clamping and the dangers of turning unbalanced workpieces is recommended. An interlock on the chuck guard would prevent keys being left in the chuck. | TBD | TBD | TBD| 
-| Contact with moving machinery. Operating the lathe involves working in close proximity to machinery and workpieces rotating at high speed. Even if no entanglement occurs serious injury can result if there is contact with rotating parts. | Lathe users and others nearby | Never touch rotating machinery or workpieces. The system retains a lot of inertia even at low speed due to its mass: never attempt to stop rotation after turning off the machine by grabbing the chuck or workpiece. Take care to keep well clear of rotating parts, especially when performing operations near the chuck. A chuck guard helps mitigate the risk of contacting the chuck. | Interlocking the chuck guard if this is not already the case. | TBD | TBD | TBD |+| Contact with moving machinery. Operating the lathe involves working in close proximity to machinery and workpieces rotating at high speed. Even if no entanglement occurs serious injury can result if there is contact with rotating parts. The 3-jaw and 4-jaw chucks have jaws which can stick outside the main chuck body and can catch fingers etc. and at speed they may not be very visible. | Lathe users and others nearby | Never touch rotating machinery or workpieces. The system retains a lot of inertia even at low speed due to its mass: never attempt to stop rotation after turning off the machine by grabbing the chuck or workpiece. Take care to keep well clear of rotating parts, especially when performing operations near the chuck. A chuck guard helps mitigate the risk of contacting the chuck. | Interlocking the chuck guard if this is not already the case. | TBD | TBD | TBD |
 | Contact with swarf. Swarf is waste material generated during cutting. Swarf is typically very sharp and often hot when first formed and may cause cuts and burns if handled incorrectly. Small pieces of swarf may become embedded in the skin. Cutting some materials will eject swarf at high speed and in several directions: there is a risk of serious injury if it becomes lodged in the eye for example. Long ribbons of swarf can create risks associated with entanglement if attempts are made to clear them incorrectly during cutting. Some materials create an extremely fine swarf (brass for example) which may be a respiratory risk. | Lathe users and others nearby | Swarf ribbons, especially from harder materials such as steels, should be handled with tools rather than by hand to avoid cuts and burns. Needlenose pliers are suitable for this. Smaller chips should be cleaned up with a brush or shop vacuum. Swarf ribbons should not be cleared while the lathe is operating due to the risk of entanglement. Safety glasses should be worn when using the lathe to protect the eyes. Where appropriate a suitable mask can be used to protect against fine dust like swarf. | Suitable tools for managing swarf should be provided close to the lathe to make correct procedure the path of least resistance. Training should be provided in choosing machine settings to optimise swarf form and avoid creation of long swarf ribbons. | TBD |  TBD | TBD | | Contact with swarf. Swarf is waste material generated during cutting. Swarf is typically very sharp and often hot when first formed and may cause cuts and burns if handled incorrectly. Small pieces of swarf may become embedded in the skin. Cutting some materials will eject swarf at high speed and in several directions: there is a risk of serious injury if it becomes lodged in the eye for example. Long ribbons of swarf can create risks associated with entanglement if attempts are made to clear them incorrectly during cutting. Some materials create an extremely fine swarf (brass for example) which may be a respiratory risk. | Lathe users and others nearby | Swarf ribbons, especially from harder materials such as steels, should be handled with tools rather than by hand to avoid cuts and burns. Needlenose pliers are suitable for this. Smaller chips should be cleaned up with a brush or shop vacuum. Swarf ribbons should not be cleared while the lathe is operating due to the risk of entanglement. Safety glasses should be worn when using the lathe to protect the eyes. Where appropriate a suitable mask can be used to protect against fine dust like swarf. | Suitable tools for managing swarf should be provided close to the lathe to make correct procedure the path of least resistance. Training should be provided in choosing machine settings to optimise swarf form and avoid creation of long swarf ribbons. | TBD |  TBD | TBD |
 | Trapping and pinching. Movement of machinery under power feed or while screw-cutting can create trapping, pinching and crushing hazards between parts of the lathe, tool, or workpiece. | Lathe users and those in close proximity (e.g. people being trained on the lathe) | Keep well clear of moving components when operating power feeds or screw-cutting. Do not lean on the lathe or e.g. stand up against the carriage. While operating the machine only touch the controls (motor control switches, hand wheels etc.) to avoid placing hands in hazardous locations. | Further guarding could be used to reduce risk, e.g. roller blind type guards. But this is probably overkill and training in proper tool use is probably more useful. | TBD | TBD | TBD | | Trapping and pinching. Movement of machinery under power feed or while screw-cutting can create trapping, pinching and crushing hazards between parts of the lathe, tool, or workpiece. | Lathe users and those in close proximity (e.g. people being trained on the lathe) | Keep well clear of moving components when operating power feeds or screw-cutting. Do not lean on the lathe or e.g. stand up against the carriage. While operating the machine only touch the controls (motor control switches, hand wheels etc.) to avoid placing hands in hazardous locations. | Further guarding could be used to reduce risk, e.g. roller blind type guards. But this is probably overkill and training in proper tool use is probably more useful. | TBD | TBD | TBD |
-| Hot components. Tools, workpieces, the chuck and tailstock tailstock, waste material and cutting fluids can all become hot during operations. This can lead to burns if the hot components are touched or grabbed. | Lathe users | Take care when releasing work from the lathe to ensure it has cooled sufficiently to be touched. Remember that work separated from the stock (e.g. during parting off) will be hot and should not be caught in the hand as it separates or immediately retrieved. Practice testing the temperature of objects gently instead of immediately grabbing with a strong grip. | Addition of a coolant system would help mitigate this as well as improving lathe performance and machining quality. | TBD | TDB| TBD |+| Hot components. Tools, workpieces, the chuck and tailstock tailstock, waste material and cutting fluids can all become hot during operations. This can lead to burns if the hot components are touched or grabbed. | Lathe users | Take care when releasing work from the lathe to ensure it has cooled sufficiently to be touched. Remember that work separated from the stock (e.g. during parting off) will be hot and should not be caught in the hand as it separates or immediately retrieved. Practice testing the temperature of objects gently instead of immediately grabbing with a strong grip. Avoid open necked clothing to stop hot swarf getting onto skin. | Addition of a coolant system would help mitigate this as well as improving lathe performance and machining quality. | TBD | TDB| TBD |
 | Sharp components. Cutting tools, freshly machined workpiece edges, swarf, and other components have sharp edges which can cause cuts and abrasions if handled incorrectly. | Lathe users | Training to increase awareness of where sharp edges can be found or are likely to develop while using the lathe. Avoid testing tool sharpness with a finger. Deburr workpieces before handling extensively to avoid cuts. In some situations gloves may be appropriate for handling sharp items, but these **must not be worn while operating the machine**. | No further mitigation is proposed | TBD | TBD | TBD | | Sharp components. Cutting tools, freshly machined workpiece edges, swarf, and other components have sharp edges which can cause cuts and abrasions if handled incorrectly. | Lathe users | Training to increase awareness of where sharp edges can be found or are likely to develop while using the lathe. Avoid testing tool sharpness with a finger. Deburr workpieces before handling extensively to avoid cuts. In some situations gloves may be appropriate for handling sharp items, but these **must not be worn while operating the machine**. | No further mitigation is proposed | TBD | TBD | TBD |
-| Heavy components. Heavy removable lathe components such as chucks, slides, faceplates and the tailstock have the potential to cause harm due to their weight. Hazards include crushing e.g. between chuck and bed when removing a chuck or if a heavy item is dropped on a foot, and strains and sprains where lifting is not performed correctly. | Lathe users, others nearby. | Seek assistance when moving heavy components. Use proper lifting techniques to avoid strains and sprains. Avoid placing body parts beneath heavy items. | Clearly labelling e.g. chucks with their mass will help users make informed judgements when attempting to move these items. | TBD | TBD | TBD |+| Heavy components. Heavy removable lathe components such as chucks, slides, faceplates and the tailstock have the potential to cause harm due to their weight. Hazards include crushing e.g. between chuck and bed when removing a chuck or if a heavy item is dropped on a foot, and strains and sprains where lifting is not performed correctly. Dropping of heavy components onto the lathe ways will damage them. | Lathe users, others nearby. | Seek assistance when moving heavy components. Use proper lifting techniques to avoid strains and sprains. Avoid placing body parts beneath heavy items. | Clearly labelling e.g. chucks with their mass will help users make informed judgements when attempting to move these items. If not already provided a simple wooden cover will help protect the ways when changing chucks. | TBD | TBD | TBD |
 | Accidental machine starting / incorrect settings / poor knowledge of machine controls. A lack of attention or training can lead to the lathe being started unexpectedly or in an unexpected or unknown configuration (e.g. under power feed, at high speed). This could lead to injury or damage to equipment. | Lathe users, others nearby. | TBD | Training/​induction should be provided and members only given unrestricted access to the lathe when they are able to demonstrate a good understanding of the lathe controls and safe procedures when starting and operating the equipment. Procedures should be provided for starting and finishing using the lathe so the equipment is not left in an unknown state. Controls should be clearly labelled. | TBD | TBD | TBD | | Accidental machine starting / incorrect settings / poor knowledge of machine controls. A lack of attention or training can lead to the lathe being started unexpectedly or in an unexpected or unknown configuration (e.g. under power feed, at high speed). This could lead to injury or damage to equipment. | Lathe users, others nearby. | TBD | Training/​induction should be provided and members only given unrestricted access to the lathe when they are able to demonstrate a good understanding of the lathe controls and safe procedures when starting and operating the equipment. Procedures should be provided for starting and finishing using the lathe so the equipment is not left in an unknown state. Controls should be clearly labelled. | TBD | TBD | TBD |
 | Electric shock. The lathe runs from mains voltage, and a shock risk exists if wiring is damaged or modified. | Lathe users | Regular PAT testing to verify electrical safety. Users should check for damage to exposed cable before using the lathe. | I assume there is adequate fusing /circuit breaking etc. Is there a schedule for PAT testing? | TBD | TBD | TBD | | Electric shock. The lathe runs from mains voltage, and a shock risk exists if wiring is damaged or modified. | Lathe users | Regular PAT testing to verify electrical safety. Users should check for damage to exposed cable before using the lathe. | I assume there is adequate fusing /circuit breaking etc. Is there a schedule for PAT testing? | TBD | TBD | TBD |
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 | Working in limited space. There is somewhat limited space around the lathe, this increases the chance of lathe users or others being pushed or falling into contact with the machine while it is operating. There is a serious risk of injury associated with this. | Lathe users, others nearby | Area around the lathe should be closed off when the lathe is in use. Some tools will not be able to be used at the same time as the lathe is in use (pillar drill? table saw?). Negotiate with other users of the lab to avoid conflict. | Is there actually a way of closing off the area around the lathe? A couple of retractable tape barriers would probably be sufficient. It might also be worth having a system such that it is clear the lathe is in use for people entering the workshop? | TBD | TBD | TBD | | Working in limited space. There is somewhat limited space around the lathe, this increases the chance of lathe users or others being pushed or falling into contact with the machine while it is operating. There is a serious risk of injury associated with this. | Lathe users, others nearby | Area around the lathe should be closed off when the lathe is in use. Some tools will not be able to be used at the same time as the lathe is in use (pillar drill? table saw?). Negotiate with other users of the lab to avoid conflict. | Is there actually a way of closing off the area around the lathe? A couple of retractable tape barriers would probably be sufficient. It might also be worth having a system such that it is clear the lathe is in use for people entering the workshop? | TBD | TBD | TBD |
 | Equipment damage / collision. Some operations can result in equipment collision and/or damage, e.g. running the tool into the chuck, poor workpiece mounting resulting in collision between workpiece and lathe. Some operations using the lathe controls may cause damage if performed incorrectly,​ e.g. putting the lathe into reverse while running it forward (not sure if this is true for the Bantam MkI) | Lathe users | Proper training on lathe use will mitigate most of these issues. Users must be familiar with all lathe controls before being allowed to use the machine unattended. Extra care must be taken when performing operations near the chuck. | Clear labelling of controls may help mitigate issues due to lack of familiarity with the lathe. | TBD | TBD | TBD | | Equipment damage / collision. Some operations can result in equipment collision and/or damage, e.g. running the tool into the chuck, poor workpiece mounting resulting in collision between workpiece and lathe. Some operations using the lathe controls may cause damage if performed incorrectly,​ e.g. putting the lathe into reverse while running it forward (not sure if this is true for the Bantam MkI) | Lathe users | Proper training on lathe use will mitigate most of these issues. Users must be familiar with all lathe controls before being allowed to use the machine unattended. Extra care must be taken when performing operations near the chuck. | Clear labelling of controls may help mitigate issues due to lack of familiarity with the lathe. | TBD | TBD | TBD |
-| Defective equipment. Poorly maintained or damaged equipment may cause injury, especially if the issue is not reported and subsequent attempts are made to use the machine. | Lathe users, others nearby | Any equipment issues should be reported immediately and access to the lathe suspended if necessary until the issue is resolved. Decisions can be taken on a case by case basis but the machine should not continue to be used if clear safety risks exist. | Is there a way to globally suspend access to the machine until H&S issues are resolved? | TBD | TBD | TBD |+| Defective equipment. Poorly maintained or damaged equipment may cause injury, especially if the issue is not reported and subsequent attempts are made to use the machine. The spindle brake for example is known to be temperamental and should not be relied on to provide an emergency stop. | Lathe users, others nearby | Any equipment issues should be reported immediately and access to the lathe suspended if necessary until the issue is resolved. Decisions can be taken on a case by case basis but the machine should not continue to be used if clear safety risks exist. | Is there a way to globally suspend access to the machine until H&S issues are resolved? | TBD | TBD | TBD |
 | Lone working. The lathe has the potential to be a very dangerous piece of equipment. Situations can arise where a user may require urgent assistance. As such, lone working represents a significant hazard. | Lathe users | TBD | Propose that the lathe should not be used if the operator is on their own in the Hacklab. It probably isn't necessary to have two people in the room at all times while the machine is in use. However those using the lathe should notify others in the lab as to their intentions before starting. What is the procedure for other dangerous items (bandsaw / TIG welder)? | TBD | TBD | TBD | | Lone working. The lathe has the potential to be a very dangerous piece of equipment. Situations can arise where a user may require urgent assistance. As such, lone working represents a significant hazard. | Lathe users | TBD | Propose that the lathe should not be used if the operator is on their own in the Hacklab. It probably isn't necessary to have two people in the room at all times while the machine is in use. However those using the lathe should notify others in the lab as to their intentions before starting. What is the procedure for other dangerous items (bandsaw / TIG welder)? | TBD | TBD | TBD |
batnamlathe_riskassessment.txt · Last modified: 2020-05-31 17:46 by jerome_woodwark